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On the evening of October 20, more than 130 people convened at the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation Community Centre to learn about the amazing work First Nations communities are doing to care for species at risk and their habitats across Ontario. The evening event was generously hosted by Chippewas of the Thames First Nation southwest of London, and presented as part of Carolinian Canada’s Ecosystem Recovery Forum series, with funding support from Environment Canada. First Nations from as far away as Wikwemikong on Manitoulin Island and Neyaashiinigmiing on the Bruce Peninsula showcased their species at risk projects with presentations and displays. Young conservationists from Aamjiwnaang and Chippewas of the Thames First Nations showcased the multifaceted activities of the “Antler River Guardians from the Four Directions” youth group over the past year. Bkejwanong (Walpole Island) First Nation presentations emphasized the strong linkages between nature preservation, traditions and language in local Anishinaabe culture. The event was a unique sharing of traditional knowledge, modern science and practical on-the-ground conservation practices -- a wonderful learning experience for all, set in the heart of Ontario's Carolinian life zone.

Carolinian Canada staff are thrilled to welcome Karolyne Pickett as our new Carolinian Zone Ecologist.  Karolyne brings a wealth of biological experience to our team, notably with species at risk-related work with both the federal and provincial governments.  Karolyne enjoys working with people from all walks of life and will be playing an important role with our Landowner Leaders program over the coming months.

Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - 7:00pm

Ontario's Invasive Species Act, bill 167, has recently received royal assent.

Sunday, October 4, 2015 - 8:00pm
Join us on October 20th and learn about the amazing work First Nations communities are doing to care for species at risk and their habitats! The evening event, generously hosted by Chippewas of the Thames First Nation southwest of London, will include a traditional Anishinaabe welcome ceremony, a full dinner, talks by First Nation Species At Risk
Thursday, October 1, 2015 - 8:00pm

September is one of the most exciting months in the birding world.  In the northern hemisphere, bird populations are at their highest after the breeding season and most migratory species are on the move, so you never know what you are going to find on any given day.  I had great luck.

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Carolinian Canada will make every effort to provide assistance making materials accessible on request. Contact info@carolinian.org for more information
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