1984-2004
  • CAROLINIAN CANADA

CAROLINIAN SPECIES
& H
ABITATS
     
Carolinian Forests    
Carolinian Forest Fauna

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Photo: Mark Peck
Photo: Mark Peck
Prothonatary Warbler, (Protonotaria citrea)

Endangered nationally and provincially.

Prothonotary Warbler, Species-at-Risk Information

Natural history information at the Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter


Photo: Mark Peck
Photo: Mark Peck
Hooded Warbler, (Wilsonia citrina)

Threatened nationally.

Hooded Warbler, Species-at-Risk Information

Natural history information at the Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter


Photo: George Peck
Photo: George Peck
Cerulean Warbler, (Dendroica cerulea)

The Cerulean Wabler is classified as Special Concern nationally and Vulnerable provincially

Species-at-risk information

Natural history information at the Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter



Photo: C.S. Robbins
Carolina Wren, (Thryothorus ludovicianus)

Natural history information at the Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter


Scarlet Tanager: William Paff
Photo: William Paff
Scarlet Tanager, (Piranga olivacea)

Natural history information at the Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter


Photo: George Peck
Photo: George Peck
Acadian Flycatcher, (Empidonax virescens)

Endangered nationally.

Species at risk information.

Natural history information at the Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter


Photo: George Peck
Photo: George Peck
Red-headed Woodpecker, (Melanerpes erythrocephalus)

Natural history information at the Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter


Red-bellied Woodpecker, (Melanerpes carolinus)

The red bellied woodpecker does not have a red belly, but is the only woodpecker with black and white bars all the way across its back, and a large red cap on its head. In appearance it resembles a small flicker.

Natural history information at the Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter


Photo: Mark Stabb
Photo: Mark Stabb
Southern Flying Squirrel, (Glaucomys volans)

This nocturnal, small mammal gets its name from the gliding technique that it uses to parachute between trees. It is found in limited numbers along the shores of Lakes Erie and Ontario, and occasionally throughout southern Quebec. These squirrels depend largely on nut bearing trees for their food supply, and the existence of snags (free standing, dead trees) for nesting sites. The large, mature hardwood forests, characteristic of the Carolinian zone, appear to be the last vestige of its required habitat within Canada.

Forest Flora    
Forest Fauna    
Old Field & Forest Edge Species    
Tall Grass Prairie & Savanna
Wetlands, Lakes, Rivers & Shorelines
Rare Species & Ecosystems
Carolinian Indicator Species
Uniqueness of Carolinian Canada
 
   
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       
       
 

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