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2010 Conservation Action Plans (CAPs)

Carolinian Canada CAPs
Conservation Action Plans for Carolinian Canada Biodiversity Hotspots

 

The diversity of agencies, groups and organizations with conservation mandates, combined with the number of species and habitats requiring attention in Carolinian Canada, results in a considerable challenge to ensure that conservation efforts are well-coordinated and collaborative. The Carolinian Woodlands Recovery Team (CWRT), formed in 2004, determined that landscape- and ecosystem-based approaches undertaken in areas of high biodiversity would be the most effective and efficient way to implement the recovery of multiple Species At Risk (SAR), and that integration and coordination of implementation activities by numerous local partners was essential to achieve the greatest conservation success.

The CWRT determined that efforts should be prioritised on the places where need for action was most urgent, and where the greatest positive return for conservation efforts would be gained. In 2007, fifteen high priority areas were identified through GIS-based analysis conducted by The Nature Conservancy of Canada in partnership with the Carolinian Canada Coalition (CCC), the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and Environment Canada (EC), applying proven analysis techniques.

The Conservation Action Planning (CAP) approach developed by The Nature Conservancy (U.S.), which is being used all over the world, is a tested, comprehensive, adaptable approach designed to ensure that conservation practitioners and stakeholders are working together. Its methods are science-based, focused and efficient, and have evolved over a period of more than 25 years of trial and error in an array of ecosystems, cultures and political environments. CAPs provide a clear, achievable, measured approach that appeals to funders.

Collaborating agencies and organizations provide the ecological expertise and local knowledge (socioeconomic, political, practical) to develop effective plans. In 2008, pilot Carolinian Canada CAPs were initiated in partnership with an array of national, provincial, regional and local organisations for three of the 15 hotspot areas: Essex Forests and Wetlands; Ausable River – Kettle Point to Pinery; and Upper Thames River. In 2009, CAPs were developed in three additional hotspot areas in the southeastern portion of the Carolinian life zone: the Hamilton – Burlington area (within Ecodistricdt 7E-3); the Short Hills area; and the Niagara River Corridor.

 

Five of these six CAPs are currently available for download below.

Read about our Pilot CAP project in 2009 for Essex Forests and Wetland Natural Areas click here

Hamilton-Burlington CAP

Short Hills CAP

Niagara River Corridor CAP

Ausable River: Kettle Point to Pinery CAP



 

Hamilton-Burlington CAP
(February 2010)

Vision Statement:

The Hamilton – Burlington area supports a full range of healthy terrestrial and aquatic habitats, including characteristic Carolinian deciduous forests, Niagara Escarpment ecosystems, dry oak woodlands, prairies and savannahs, successional thickets and fields and sand dunes, as well as coastal and inland wetland and aquatic ecosystems. Species at Risk thrive in a variety of secure habitats, which contribute to the overall connected matrix of natural cover. Natural heritage systems are restored in order to connect fragmented natural areas, and river and stream corridors.

Stewardship and site management focuses on further conserving and enhancing the biodiversity values of the area. The local community takes pride in the natural beauty and health of the area, and members from all sectors and backgrounds participate in stewardship and conservation. Relationships between conservation partners are strong and reciprocal, allowing for maximum success in conservation efforts across the interconnected, ecologically functional landscape.

Download full report here (PDF 20.6MB)

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Southern Flying Squirrel
photo credit
: unknown


Hooded Warbler
photo credit:
Mark Peck


 

Short Hills CAP
(February 2010)

Vision Statement:

The Short Hills natural area supports a full range of healthy terrestrial and aquatic habitats, including characteristic Carolinian deciduous forests, dry oak woodlands, prairies and savannahs, lowland swamp forests, riparian and aquatic ecosystems, rich coastal marshes and seepage fens. Species at Risk thrive in a variety of secure habitats, which contribute to the overall connected matrix of natural cover. Natural heritage systems are restored in order to connect fragmented natural areas, and river and stream corridors.

Stewardship and site management focuses on further conserving and enhancing the biodiversity values of the area. The local community takes pride in the natural beauty and health of the area, and members from all sectors and backgrounds participate in stewardship and conservation. Relationships between conservation partners are strong and reciprocal, allowing for maximum success in conservation efforts across the interconnected, ecologically functional landscape.

Download full report here (PDF 2.6MB)

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White wood aster at Short Hills
photo credit: Donald Kirk


 

Niagara River Corridor CAP
(February 2010)

Vision Statement:

The Niagara River Corridor supports a full range of healthy terrestrial and aquatic habitats, including characteristic Niagara Escarpment features, Carolinian deciduous upland and lowland forests, dry oak woodlands, prairies and savannahs, seepage zones, marshes, and riparian and aquatic ecosystems. Species At Risk thrive in secure habitats, which contribute to the overall connected matrix of natural cover. Natural heritage systems are restored in order to connect fragmented natural areas, and river and stream corridors.

Stewardship and site management focuses on further conserving and enhancing the biodiversity values of the area. The local community takes pride in the natural beauty and health of the area, and members from all sectors and backgrounds participate in stewardship and conservation. Relationships between conservation partners are strong and reciprocal, allowing for maximum success in conservation efforts across the interconnected, ecologically functional landscape.

Download full report here (PDF 3.9MB)

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Cerulean Warbler
photo credit:
John Cassady


American Columbo
photo credit: Daniel Reed



 

Ausable River: Kettle Point to Pinery CAP
(March 2010)

Vision Statement:

The Ausable River – Kettle Point to Pinery natural area supports a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats, including characteristic Carolinian forests, pine – oak woodlands, dune ecosystems, prairies and savannahs, deciduous swamps, marshes, fens and other rich wetland communities. Species at Risk thrive in a variety of secure habitats, which contribute to the overall connected matrix of natural cover. Natural cover is restored, particularly in areas of the Huron Slope, in order to connect fragmented natural areas and river and stream corridors.

Stewardship and site management focuses on further conserving and enhancing the biodiversity value of the area. The local community takes pride in the area and members from all sectors and heritage participate in stewardship and conservation. Relationships between conservation partners are strong and reciprocal, allowing for maximum success in conservation efforts across the interconnected, functional landscape.

Download full report here (PDF 16.2MB)

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Spiny Softshell Turtle
photo credit: Scott Gillinwater


Wild Lupines
photo credit: Karen May

 

 

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