Respect Forest Boundaries | Carolinian Canada

Respect Forest Boundaries

 
O'Neill Nature Preserve Seeks Good Friends and Neighbours

 

The O'Neill Nature Peserve with its Rotary EcoTrail lives to make life better for both people and its own native inhabitants. Among other benefits, its naturally friendly gestures help us breathe, filter our water and provide tranquil shade when we need it.

Wondering how to return this kindness and foster a healthy long-term relationship with this nature preserve and other natural areas? The answer is easy: honour forest property boundaries.

Respecting boundaries is the single, most effective way to keep an urban forest healthy. Show your respect for the forest boundaries by: 

  • Becoming aware of a forest's property lines, especially if you are an adjacent landowner
  • Gardening and mowing only on your own property, particularly where it borders natural areas
  • No dumping of yard waste in natural areas
  • Using only marked paths, entranceways and exits

Research shows that . . .

  • People who live closest to natural areas can do the most to improve forest health
  • Deciduous forests, especially leafy undergrowth and young seedlings, are very sensitive to human activities
  • Forest boundary quality is an indicator of health
  • Degrading forest boundaries puts a natural areas ecosystem at risk

TAKE THIS PLEDGE AND JOIN OTHERS WHO ARE SHOWING THEIR SUPPORT

IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY DEMONSTRATING YOUR CARE FOR PAXTON'S BUSH, BE SURE TO TELL US HOW AND WHY. YOUR STORY COULD BE PUBLISHED! 

Your pledge may help the Endangered Butternut

Butternut tree (Juglans cinerea) is also known as the White Walnut. It is listed as nationally and provincially Endangered. Unfortunately, Butternut is succumbing to a disease called Butternut Canker that can infect even healthy trees. If you are encroaching on a natural area you could be harming young butternut trees or preventing their germination.

Your pledge could help the endangered Butternut. Photo: Seelig, R.A. Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution
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Additional Resources: 

McKinney, Michael. 2002.  "Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation." BioScience. 52(10). pages 883-890.

McWilliam, Wendy, Paul Eagles, and Robert Brown. 2010. "Assessing the Degradation Effects of Local Residents on Urban Forests in Ontario, Canada."Arboriculture & Urban Forestry. 36(6). pages 253-260.

 

Feature Story: 
Your neighbouring woodlot helps you breathe, filters your water, keeps you cool and who always welcomes you for a stroll. Wondering how to give back? Respect forest boundaries - the single, most effective way to keep an urban forest healthy.
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